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Posts Tagged ‘English counties’

Just popping in quickly to share a photo from this morning’s sunrise.

I’m currently in South Devon, started a new booking today, but travelled here on Monday and spent 2 nights and a day in Paignton, with a visit to Torquay and Brixham and a walk along the South West Coast Path (more on that to come).

Meanwhile I went down to the seafront at 6am to watch the sunrise and I was not disappointed

You can just see the 2 cruise ships to the middle and far right

I’ll write soon about the trip….

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I have just spent the last 12 days at a job in a suburb of Preston, Lancashire and although I haven’t been able to explore the city (we’re just too far away), I have been able to explore Preston Cemetery 🙂 Although Preston Cemetery was established in and opened in 1855, the earliest year of a recorded death was 1781. I did search all over for this particular grave but was unsuccessful.

preston cemetery lancashire

Preston Cemetery

The cemetery is a 5-8 minute walk away from the house and en-route to the store where we collect the newspaper, so I’ve had plenty of opportunity to visit during my breaks…which have been a tad tricky to arrange, but I’ve deliberately made a plan to get out, even if just for a hour….or on my way to the store 😉

preston cemetery lancashire

Preston Cemetery, Lancashire. the newer section at 09:36 in the morning

I initially thought that the section I walked past was it…but one day as I explored farther afield, and wondered at the fact that most of the memorials appeared to be fairly new, I discovered the older, original section….now we’re talking.

preston cemetery lancashire

Preston Cemetery, Lancashire – the old section

Oh my gosh, it’s amazing. the Victorians really went all out on their extravagant memorials, some of which are quite simply outlandish…huge and ostentatious; urns, wreaths, broken columns, upside-down torches, obelisks, grieving women

preston cemetery lancashire

albeit a later burial; a grieving woman – Preston Cemetery, Lancashire

– many monuments in Victorian cemeteries are pagan rather than Christian, or classical (Roman) or Egyptian.

preston cemetery lancashire

Victorian funerary symbols

Victorian graves tended to be much more elaborate than modern graves. It was expected that a middle-class family would spend as much as it could afford on a monument appropriate to the deceased’s (and the family’s) social status. Monuments were usually symbolic – either religious (crosses, angels, the letters IHS, a monogram for Jesus Savior of Man in Greek), symbols of profession (whip and horseshoes for a coach driver, swords for a general, palette for a painter), or symbols of death.

preston cemetery lancashire

A wreath decorates the gates of Preston Cemetery

I’ve taken a load of photos of some of the memorials, but you can be sure there is a surfeit of extraordinary plots and memorials to be seen. Many of the memorials are unsurprisingly, but very sadly for babies and children of all ages, from the tiniest infant through to children of 10 and upwards into teens.

preston cemetery lancashire

memorials on the newer side

These early deaths are not limited to the Victorians, one memorial I saw was for two babies from the same family who died a few days apart at 3 months and 3.5 months, along with a number of other family members, different times, all young. Oh the tragedy.

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this appears to be a family plot…so many all with the same name; some mere infants

In all my years of exploring cemeteries around the UK, I have never seen so many memorials for infants 😦

Although cemeteries have an air of sadness and desolation about them, they are fascinating places to visit with so many stories of lives lived, some long, many short, others in service to King and Country. Preston Cemetery is also the location for Commonwealth War Graves……too young!!

preston cemetery lancashire

Commonwealth War Graves – WW1

These cemeteries are also places of incredible beauty.

preston cemetery lancashire

Preston Cemetery, Lancashire

I love the many graveyards and cemeteries I find on my travels around the UK, Preston has certainly been one of my favourites.

preston cemetery lancashire

life and death; autumn beauty in a Victorian cemetery

A couple of interesting, albeit gruesome articles about death, dying and cemeteries in Victorian England and London.

http://listverse.com/2015/06/21/10-odd-and-eerie-tales-of-londons-victorian-cemeteries/

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/jan/22/death-city-grisly-secrets-victorian-london-dead

 

 

 

 

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How exciting…..I have now added Lancashire to the list of counties I have visited in the UK.  Slowly but surely I am getting there….in the not too distant future I will have visited all the counties in England at least 😉

I started this job on Wednesday this week and after a VERY early morning start from Broadstairs

Preston lancashire

Broadstairs 07:11 on 16th November

and three train changes I was on my way up nooooth!!  The landscape from the train is just stunning. We whizzed along past towns and cities, briefly glimpsed as the train rushed by. There’s something quite thrilling about high-speed train travel…

Preston Lancashire

My view from the train….stunning scenery and a rainbow

The further north we travelled, the more beautiful the landscape got….the autumnal colours are astounding; richer, brighter colours that made me want to stop the train so I could take photos; rich red, burnt orange, vibrant yellow and crispy brown all paint a bright palette against the evergreens. I was lucky enough to glimpse a rainbow too!!

As we drew nearer to Preston (my destination) we crossed over a river!!! Absolutely stunning. Unfortunately I was just too slow with my camera to capture it. I will have to investigate…can’t let a river go by and not explore!

Preston Station is a relic of those marvellous Victorians who created so many beautiful structures, structures that have stood the test of time and continue to amaze us still today. Welcome to Lancashire!

Preston Lancashire

Welcome to Lancashire

I hopped into a taxi and hoped it would head towards the river, but no, to my intense disappointment we are miles away from the centre of Preston 😦 in a suburb called Ribbleton; a seemingly purpose-built town that’s been absorbed into the fabric of the city and now features as a suburb; Ribbleton was a civil parish from 1866 until 1 April 1934 at which time it was absorbed into the County Borough. According to wikipedia, Ribbleton has a library, a number of shops, a pub, post offices and schools. Whoaaaa….I’m definitely going to be exploring that then #not!!! LOL Oh well.

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Preston station, Lancashire

My assignment is a double-up with a second Carer and since the notes from the agency said that the Carer can leave the house for their breaks, I thought (mistakenly) that I would be able to hop on a bus and go explore the city centre…but no, the outgoing carer said we can’t leave for more than an hour!! ffs. It really annoys me when I get fed misinformation.

I do believe that the house is near to the Preston Cemetery, so at least I can get to check that out. The cemetery opened July 2nd, in 1855 and according to their website there are 60,108 people interred there with 14,458 gravestones and 3816 different surnames. The earliest year of death is 1781, with the first interment being one: Elizabeth Frances Christian. I did a bit of research on surnames just for fun and although I found a few ‘Eves’ I didn’t find any ‘Eve’ surnames, so I’m guessing we didn’t head this way then…..

I had occasion to step out yesterday to buy the paper for M’Lady and walked past the cemetery….the trees look amazing

Preston Lancashire

Autumn colours in the cemetery

So if I am to explore Preston and see the city it will have to be within the two hours before I leave the city. What a shame. Meanwhile with a bit of research I have discovered the following:

Preston is the birthplace of Teetotalism and the Temperance Founder one Edward Grubb; The Last Survivor of that Heroic Band of Preston Pioneer Advocates by Whose Devoted and Self-Sacrificing Labours the TEETOTAL REFORM was extended from a Local to a National and World-Wide Movement. You can read a little more about Edward Grubb here.

Preston obtained city status in 2002, becoming England’s 50th city in the 50th year of Queen Elizabeth II’s reign.  Located on the north band of the River Ribble that runs through North Yorkshire and Lancashire, the Angles established Preston; its name is derived from the Old English meaning “priest’s settlement”.  In the 1086 Domesday Book it is recorded as “Prestune”. Needless to say the Romans have been here….and during that period Roman roads passed close to what is now the centre of Preston. The Romans built some amazing roads during their tenure, one of which ran from Luguvalium (Carlisle) to Mamucium (Manchester) and crossed the River Ribble at Walton-le-Dale, 3⁄4 mile (1 km) southeast of the centre of the city.

So, in summary, I’m dying to get out and explore!!! But when?  Urgh. The joys of my job.

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