Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘cities of england’

Its extraordinary to realise that Salisbury has had a twice weekly market since 1227!

I popped over yesterday to try find some avocado but unfortunately I didn’t find any nice ones. Instead I did find some local farmers free range eggs and promptly bought a half dozen. I avoid eggs as much as possible because I don’t know their provenance and I do know that the supermarkets ‘free range eggs’ are not truly ‘free range’. I had 2 for my supper and the first one I cracked had a double yolk ūüėĄūüėĄ

The market was in full swing when I got there, but not nearly as busy as I would have thought, but with Covid…its to be expected.

The colours on a grey day were a welcome sight, and although my time was limited, I did manage to whizz around and look at all the stalls.

I saw these delicious olives, and was tempted…maybe Tuesday

Yummy

Later during my break, I walked through enroute from here to nowhere in particular, and it looked bereft…hardly anyone about. I guess the weather doesn’t help.

Intrigued by the date, I did a bit of research, and this is what I found. The market has been held in Salisbury since 1219 with the founding of the city, and the cathedral. At the time Salisbury was the largest city in the region and offered an opportunity for farmers and traders to sell their produce and wares.

In 1361, market days were formalised and decreed to be held every Tuesday and Saturday, a tradition that continues until today. In medieval times, the market was much larger than it is today, and even spread down side streets. The streets in the area reflect the types of goods sold during medieval times; Fish Row, Silver Street, Butcher Row and the Poultry Cross.

Poultry Cross
Butcher Row
Silver Street
Fish Row
Salt Lane
This intrigued me ūüėĄūüėĄ Chipper Lane..

I wonder, did they have the equivalent of today’s chippy…?

I’ve been fortunate enough to visit many a market in towns around the country over the years, but even so, the amazement of the history never wanes.

Salisbury was a settlement in Domesday Book, in the hundred of Alderbury, mentioned in the chapters for Wiltshire and Somerset.

It had a recorded population of 102 households in 1086, putting it in the largest 20% of settlements recorded in Domesday, and is listed under 2 owners in Domesday Book.

For more information about Salisbury and The Domesday Book, visit their site

And if that’s not enough history for you….Salisbury Cathedral is home to a copy of the Magna Carta too ūüėČ

Read Full Post »

Revisiting the City of Winchester pre-pilgrimage 19.08.2018.

I’ve been to Winchester many times, the first in 2003 not long after I arrived in the UK. It is quite one of my favourite cities and a revisit is never hard to do. Besides London it is the city I have visited most often in the 16 years I have lived in the UK. Since the Pilgrim’s Way starts in Winchester, it was imperative that I spent a day revisiting favourite places and especially following the King Alfred Walk, before starting on my walk the next week.

There’s so much I could tell you about Winchester, but that would require a very long blog…so instead I’ll stick with the more pertinent and juicy bits….

The area around Winchester had been inhabited since pre-historic times and there are 3 iron-age sites nearby.

Winchester, built around 70AD, was known as¬†Venta Belgarum, “Venta of the Belgae” during Roman times and there are small remnants of Roman wall near the East Gate bridge. The 5th largest town in Roman Britain.

Winchester became known as¬†Wintan-ceastre¬†(“Fort Venta”) in¬†Old English. In 648,¬†King Cenwalh¬†of¬†Wessex¬†erected the Church of St Peter and St Paul which was later known as the¬†Old Minster. There are remnants of this that you can see in the grounds of the cathedral.

Winchester was once the capital of England, ruled by Alfred the Great, King of Wessex from 871 to 899.

peninsula barracks winchester, the westgate museum, the great hall winchester palace, st swithuns church winchester, explore winchester, the pilgrims way, king alfreds walk

Winchester Coat of Arms

Starting at the cathedral I’ll take you on a circular tour of the city….

The fabulous medieval Winchester Cathedral, originally built in 1079; is one of the largest in Europe, and distinguished by having the longest nave and overall length of all the Gothic cathedrals in Europe. It’s architecture spans the 11th – 16th centuries.

The cathedral houses the Shrine of St Swithun (born in Winchester Рdied 863 AD); an Anglo-Saxon bishop of Winchester, he became the 19th bishop in 852 and subsequently patron saint of Winchester Cathedral.

Winchester is the start of St Swithun’s Way and The Pilgrim’s Way to Canterbury.

Take a look at the ruins of the Old Minster to the left of the west door, and be sure to visit Queen Eleanor’s garden , accessed through the cathedral.

Pilgrim’s Hall – situated in the Cathedral Close, and known as the Pilgrim’s Hall as it was used to accommodate pilgrims who visited St Swithun’s shrine. It’s the earliest hammer-beamed building still standing in England.

pilgrims hall winchester, winchester cathedral, city of winchester, the pilgrims way, st swithuns shrine, queen eleanors garden, old minster winchester

The Pilgrim’s Hall

Two of the 5 city gates are still standing: Kings Gate and the West Gate.

Just before Priors Gate is the mid-15th century timber-framed Cheyney Court; once the Bishops Court House is a mid fifteenth-century timber-framed house.

winchester, city of winchester, explore winchester, king alfreds walk, cheyney house

Cheyney Court, Winchester

Still within the precincts of the cathedral is the Priors Gate

St Swithun-upon-Kingsgate; located above the medieval Kings Gate, one of the principal entrances to the city. Built in the¬†Middle Ages¬†in the¬†Early English style,¬†the church is unusual in that it forms a part of the fabric of the old city walls, and first appears in 13th century records – mentioned in 1264. It is mentioned in¬†Anthony Trollope’s novel¬†The Warden under the fictional name of St Cuthberts.

Jane Austen lived in a house near the cathedral and died in Winchester on 18 July 1817. She is buried in the cathedral.

jane austens house winchester, winchester, city of winchester, explore winchester, king alfreds walk, st swithuns church

the house where Jane Austen lived in Winchester – I was fortunate enough to visit her house in Chawton during my walk

Wolvesey Castle¬†– these stunning ruins,¬†standing on the site of an earlier Saxon structure, were once the¬†Norman¬†bishop’s palace, dating from 1110. Enhanced by¬†Henry de Blois¬†during¬†the Anarchy¬†of his brother King¬†Stephen’s reign, he was besieged there for some days. In the 16th c, Queen¬†Mary Tudor¬†and King¬†Philip II of Spain¬†were guests just prior to their wedding in the Cathedral. The building now a ruin and maintained by¬†English Heritage, its free to explore,¬†the chapel was incorporated into the new palace built in the 1680s, only one wing of which survives today.

Roman city walls – a small section of the old Roman city walls can be seen opposite the The Weirs alongside the river near the bridge.

The River Itchen; flowing through the mill and beneath the old Eastgate bridge, is noted as one of the world’s premier¬†chalk streams. Designated as a¬†Site of Special Scientific Interest, it¬†supports a range of protected species as well as watercress beds (I saw the watercress beds near Alresford on Day 1 of my walk).¬†The settlement of¬†Itchen Abbas¬†on the river is given as¬†Icene¬†in the¬†Domesday Book¬†of 1086.

The Eastgate Bridge – although the gate is long gone, this pretty bridge crosses the river just before the mill. If you cross the bridge away from the city, just beyond the roundabout you’ll find…..Chesil Rectory.

the wiers river itchen winchester, wolvesey castle winchester, jane austens house winchester, winchester, city of winchester, explore winchester, king alfreds walk, river itchen, eastgate bridge

The Eastgate Bridge, Winchester

Chesil Rectory – is the oldest house in Winchester; the sign says it’s dated 1450. A link with Queen Mary I; along with the water mill, she gave the rectory to the City of Winchester as compensation for the expense of her wedding. It’s now a restaurant.

the weirs river itchen winchester, wolvesey castle winchester, jane austens house winchester, winchester, city of winchester, explore winchester, king alfreds walk, river itchen, eastgate bridge, chesil rectory

Chesil Rectory, Winchester – built 1450

The Water Mill – this beautiful, working mill, is situated on the River Itchen in the centre of this ancient city; Winchester. Restored and now a Grade II listed building, it is managed by the National Trust. First recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, it was known as Eastgate Mill until 1554.

Sightings of otters passing through have been recorded by night-vision cameras.

Statue of King Alfred the Great – located just beyond the bridge, on the Broadway, this towering statue dominates the streets.¬†He is one of only two English monarchs to be given the¬†epithet¬†“the Great”, the other being Cnut The Great. The statue was designed by Hamo Thornycroft, R.A., and erected in 1899 to mark one thousand years since Alfred’s death.

The fabulous Victorian Guildhall, built in the Gothic revival style, it looks very similar to St Pancras Station in London. The lovely tourist office is located at street level.

The High Street – Following his rise to power, Alfred obliterated the Roman streets and laid down the grid you can still see today; the High Street is the oldest known road in the world (this I gleaned from articles on the web).

the high street winchester, the guildhall winchester, city of winchester, explore winchester

view of the High Street, Winchester – seen from the roof of the West Gate, looking towards the King Alfred statue on The Broadway

The City Cross aka the Buttercross, located on the High Street, and now a Scheduled Ancient Monument, has been dated to the 15th c, and features 12 statues of the Virgin Mary, saints and various other historical figures.

The West Gate Рnow a museum, is a must visit. One of two surviving fortified gateways in Winchester, the earliest surviving fabric is Anglo-Saxon.  Once a debtors’ prison you can see prisoners’ graffiti engraved on the inner walls. Amongst a fantastic collection of artefacts, the museum houses a unique collection of weights and measures and a Tudor ceiling from Winchester College. There are fab views of the city and the High Street from the Westgate roof. The museum is free to visit.

The Great Hall – all that remains of the 12th century castle, beyond a few underground passageways and walls, and one of my favourite buildings in Winchester, it houses the famous¬†King Arthur’s¬†Round Table, dating from the 13th century, which has hung in the hall from at least 1463. It was painted for Henry VIII in 1522 and features the names of the legendary Knights of the Round Table around the edge and surmounted by King Arthur seated on his throne.

The Peninsula Barracks –¬†The barracks, originally known as the Upper Barracks, Winchester, were built in the early 20th c on the site of¬†King’s House, an unfinished palace designed by¬†Sir Christopher Wren¬†for¬†Charles II¬†which was destroyed by fire in 1894.¬†Some parts of the barracks remain Grade II¬†listed buildings¬†in their own right including the Green Jackets Headquarters and the¬†Royal Green Jackets (Rifles) Museum.

If you approach the Peninsula Barracks from St James’s Lane there is a short flight of steps leading up to the square, these mark the perimeter of the old city walls, of which there are a few remnants near the river on The Weirs.

peninsula barracks winchester, the westgate museum, the great hall winchester palace, st swithuns church winchester, explore winchester, the pilgrims way, king alfreds walk

these steps mark the boundary of the city

and of a more quirky nature; located on Great Minster Street and The Square, there are 24 bollards Рpainted by The Colour Factory between 2005-2012 in the style of famous artists of the likes of David Hockney, Henri Rousseau, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and Leonardo da Vinci. They are quite lovely.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

And this brings to you back to the cathedral precinct.¬† If you enquire at the Tourist Information Centre at the Guildhall, they will provide you with a self-guided tour of the city which pretty much covers the route I’ve taken you on, except it starts near the King Alfred statue statue and goes clockwise.

Further snippets:

The Book of Winchester was the Domesday Book compiled by officials of William the Conqueror on his orders and published c1086.

John Keats stayed in Winchester from mid-August to October 1819, and¬†wrote “Isabella”, amongst other well-known works while there.

There is so much else to see in Winchester;

The Hospital of St Cross – somehow I missed visiting this place on my recent visit (I’ll have to go back ūüėČ ).¬† I’ve attached a link to the history of the church¬† http://hospitalofstcross.co.uk/history/

St Lawrence Church –¬†probably of Norman origin, and said to have been the chapel of¬†William the Conqueror’s¬†palace (built 1069-70, destroyed 1141) it is now a Grade II listed building.

Near the Great Hall are the fascinating old passageways from the castle/palace and the Hampshire Jubilee sculpture which is really beautiful

city of winchester, visit winchester, explore, winchester, palace of winchester passageways, hampshire jubilee sculpture, walking the pilgrims way

the castle passageways. not always open but pop in if they are

city of winchester, visit winchester, explore, winchester, palace of winchester passageways, hampshire jubilee sculpture, walking the pilgrims way

Hampshire Jubilee Sculpture near the Great Hall

The site of Hyde Abbey : a medieval Benedictine monastery just outside the walls of Winchester, it was dissolved and demolished in 1539.

St Bartholomew’s Church : originally the parish church of Hyde, a villages outside the walls of Winchester, the church was est 1110 and dissolved and demolished in 1539. Now a Grade II listed building, it lies directly alongside the early part of The Pilgrim’s Way.

st bartholomews church wicnhester, hyde abbey, city of winchester, explore winchester, winchester, walking the pilgrims way

St Bartholomew’s Church Winchester

I had a wonderful 5 hours walking around Winchester and of course a visit to the cathedral, after which I hopped on the train back to Southampton….delighted to have spent more time in this fabulous city. I was now getting really excited for my upcoming walk on Tuesday 21st August.

Once back in Southampton I stopped off for some dinner and now its time for London Pride at the appropriately named Spitfure Pub. Its been a very humid day, started off totally overcast, then blue skies after 2pm. I do love Winchester. The King Alfred walk takes you past so many fascinating places. I met 2 ladies who were just starting the Southdowns Way to Eastbourne….so cool.

explore winchester, visit winchester, explore winchester

always time for London Pride

I did try to keep it short…I promise LOL Winchester is a treasure trove of history and a must visit…you’ll need at least a full day to get the most out of your visit.

references:

https://www.visitwinchester.co.uk/things-to-do/history-heritage/

http://www.localhistories.org/winchester.html

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/hampshire/winchester/westgate.htm

wikipedia (of course ūüėČ )

Read Full Post »

Nottingham has been on my list of places to go ever since I arrived in the UK 17 years ago. It’s taken a while LOL. Getting around the UK is relatively easy with the extensive railway network, but it is prohibitively expensive, so my visit to Nottingham had to wait till an assignment became available…which it did in February. Exciting!! I was thrilled.

When I did the journey planner the station code came up as NOT and as it turned out, NOT pretty much described my overall visit…..NOT Nottingham. It just wasn’t at all what I expected. First impressions were thrilling….the castle built on top of the sandstone caves; gaping wounds in the cliff-face gave an indication of what lay behind the facade.

nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Sandstone cliffs and a myriad of cave

A quick walk around the city after checking in at my AirBnB led to the discovery of the fantastic 12th century inn; Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem – apparently the oldest inn in England (disputed by some) and saw the statue of Robin Hood in the plaza out front of the castle walls. I found a superb old Tudor style building nearby and delighted in the stories behind the myriad caves that lay beneath the castle.

nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Nottingham Castle gates and statue of Robin Hood

Walking further into the city I found that I could have been in any major city anywhere in the UK. Nottingham didn’t hold the quirky charm I had been expecting….high street stores, chain restaurants and charity shops. I felt robbed LOL sorry Robin.

But never one to leave any stone unturned or city unexplored, I delved deeper, determined to find the hidden gems…and I found plenty.

First up a walk through the city’s oldest area: the Lace Market. This historic quarter-mile area was once the centre of the world’s lace industry during the British Empire. Meandering the streets I was enchanted by the quirky old buildings, now dotted with street art and turned over to various other industries and businesses, the area still holds a charming olde worlde atmosphere.

nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham, lace market

The Creative Quarter; the Nottingham Lace Market

From there I made my way to The City of Caves, the entrance located on the upper level of the Broadmarsh Shopping Centre. For someone who loves caves, this was a real treat. They are fantastic and tell the story of the people who have inhabited the area for aeons, right up until when the caves were used as air-raid shelters during the 2nd WW. There is even the sound effect of an air-raid with bombers going overhead and the wail of a siren. Thrilling. I can recommend this if you enjoy history & caves and don’t suffer from claustrophobia http://www.nationaljusticemuseum.org.uk/venue/city-of-caves/

nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Walking above ground, you would never know there were 800 caves beneath your feet…a city of caves indeed.

the city of caves nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

the city of caves…..800 caves beneath your feet

I managed to visit 2 churches, one of which; The Church of St Mary the Virgin is located in the Lace Market area

st mary the virgin lace market nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest religious foundation in the City of Nottingham, England, the largest church after the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Nottingham and the largest mediaval building in the city

St Mary the Virgin, aka St Mary’s in the Lace Market was by far and away my favourite building. A Grade 1 listed building, one of only 5 in Nottingham, this fantastic 16th century church has a history is that is just astounding. Mentioned in the Domesday Book it is believed it’s roots go back deep into Saxon times. The main body of the present building (possibly the 3rd on the site) dates from the end of the reign of Edward III (1377) to that of Henry VII (1485‚Äď1509), the tower wasn’t completed till the reign of Henry VIII. There are some fascinating memorials in the church with an array of stunning stained glass windows; art works in themselves. The chantry door, dating from the 1370s or 1380s is considered to be the oldest surviving door in Nottingham and contains an example of iron work from the medieval period in the locking mechanism.

st mary the virgin, nottingham, notting cathedral, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

the Chantry door, St Mary the Virgin in the Lace Market area of Nottingham

In the grounds are a number of marvellous headstones that tell a story all their own as well the grave and a memorial plaque to Nottingham’s first black entrepreneur: George Africanus (1763-1834). This magnificent church is well worth a visit in my opinion. They depend on donations for the upkeep of this magnificent building; please give generously https://www.stmarysnottingham.org/

nottingham, the Church of St Peter with St James, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

The Church of St Peter with St James

The 2nd church; Church of St Peter with St James is a delightful church right in the centre of Nottingham. I had noticed it previously when I first arrived and was delighted to discover the link with the pilgrim St James. One of the three medieval parish churches in Nottingham, the original church was destroyed by fire in the early 1100s and rebuilt between 1180 and 1220. United with the church of St James which was demolished in the 1930’s, the church is now a Grade I listed building. The stained glass windows are a glorious rainbow of bright bold colours and above the west porch entrance is a fantastic painting of Jesus praying in the Garden of Gethsemane after the Last Supper. Painted in 1816 by Thomas Barber (1771-1843). This beautiful building offers an oasis of peace and tranquillity in a busy city.

nottingham, notting cathedral, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Nottingham Cathedral.

And the cathedral; Nottingham Cathedral is located not too far from the castle along and just off Maid Marion Way. I loved the fabulous feeling of space in this church and the ceiling seems to soar above you. An unearthly blue light fills the space, the stained glass windows adding to the ethereal atmosphere. Built between 1841 and 1844 by the architect was Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, I was delighted to discover the link to the church in Ramsgate; St Augustine’s, from whence I started my walk along The Way of St Augustine in 2017. The Blessed Sacrament Chapel is absolutely exquisite and well worth the visit.

I visited the Castle that isn’t really a castle, but more of an enormous palatial Manor house built after the original castle was destroyed by fire, and explored the fantastic displays and exhibitions quite thoroughly before embarking on a tour of the caves which were just awesome. There is a charge to visit the castle and an extra ¬£5 to visit the caves.

nottingham castle, mortimers cave, nottingham, notting cathedral, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Exhibitions in Nottingham Castle

nottingham castle, mortimers cave, nottingham, notting cathedral, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Sandstone Caves at Nottingham Castle,

Before I left I managed to squeeze in a visit to Green’s Mill. I’d seen the windmill on the horizon earlier on in my stay, and determined to visit before I left the area. Absolutely charming. It’s a working mill and you can buy freshly milled flour on the premises and a recipe book for various yummy goodies …I bought one bag of flour and a recipe book for my son-in-law who is a keen baker. You can clamber about the inside the mill which offers a look at the many mechanisms required for milling the grain into flour.

nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

Green’s Mill and Science Centre, Nottingham

The views from the top floor are well worth the climb; just mind your head going up!! Green’s Mill also depends on donations to maintain the building, so please give generously. If you’re a UK tax payer remember to tick the Gift Aid box. It all helps. https://www.greensmill.org.uk/

I managed to get in a couple of lovely walks along the canal and river as well as a visit to Victoria Park and the amazing memorial to both World Wars, on the embankment near the fantastic suspension bridge

nottingham, robin hood, cities of england, domesday book, project 101, explore nottingham, visit nottingham, what to see in nottingham

In all I spent 2.5 weeks in Nottingham, 2 weeks of which was working, and so, during my breaks I managed to get in quite a few walks around the area, many of which were along the river. On a warm clear day before the snow, I chanced upon and watched a boat race.

Nottingham. Although I was at first quite disappointed, after digging around and finding all these amazing places to visit, I can say that, despite not meeting Robin, in all I enjoyed visiting these amazing places and discovering more about the history of the city and I especially enjoyed visiting the caves.

And so my visit went from NOT Nottingham, to why NOT Nottingham.

Read Full Post »

Me As Mom ūüĆćūü•ĺūüĎí

Bringing Mommy Positivity One Laugh At A Time

Retire In Branson

Enjoying Life in the Ozarks

Cafe Catalina

Life, as told by the caffeine-fueled Cat Ramos

Wake up!

Operation Get A Life

40thousandkm

: around the world :

Dining with Donald

Donald on Dining in and Out.

Laura Bruno Lilly

The road ends, but the journey continues...

Wet and Dusty Roads

Camino stories & other journeys

Roman Life - Food, fountains and fabulous Romans

An authors tales and travel advice to inspire, inform, and help create your Roman experience https://www.amazon.com/author/brontejackson