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Posts Tagged ‘retirement’

I’m not sure if I mentioned this before 🤔🤔 but I’m walking the Thames Path for my birthday…its a milestone birthday in as much as according to the government I can officially retire!!!  🤪🤪🤪 if only.

Initially I really wanted to walk from source to sea, but have not been able to find a good relevant guide book. The Cicerone books are excellent but they only had a sea to source guide, which has been irritating me.
So I’ve been pondering how I can turn this around so I can enjoy the walk instead of feeling like I’m doing it the wrong way around…

And I just had an idea 💡 ping the old  🧠 woke up….I shall pretend I’m an explorer 😁🕵️‍♀️🕵️‍♀️🚶🏻‍♀️🚶🏻‍♀️ who has just stumbled upon this great river, and now I have to follow it to find the mysterious source hidden in the jungle….in reality it’s in a barren field and the stream is mostly dry,🤦🏼‍♀️🤦🏼‍♀️ but who’s checking 🤷‍♀️🤷‍♀️ this is my adventure and if I say it’s a jungle, then it’s a jungle 🐒🐒🐒🐆🐅🦏🐘🦒🐊🤪🤪

Sometimes it helps to be on the verge of senility, you can make up all sorts of 💩🤣🤣🤣

Thames Path…I shall 👀👉 in April well that’s the plan anyway…the PM may scupper those plans once again, unless I go incognito.

Walking the Thames Path has been a dream of mine ever since we lived in London, and I’m actually quite excited that finally I can bring my dream to fruition 😃😃 Hoorah

Gravesend
The O2
Bermondsey
City of London – Commemorating the 1666 Great Fire of London in 2016
Westminster
Chelsea
Richmond lock
The Great River Race 2016 Richmond
The Gloriana processing along The Thames during the Tudor Pull near Teddington
Teddington Lock (during my 3 Days in London days)

Over the years I’ve walked sections of the Thames Path from Gravesend to Hampton Court and I initially toyed with the idea of skipping this section, which will take me 3 days of solid walking at approximately 20/5 kms per day, BUT I know myself too well…I won’t feel as if I’ve ‘actually’ walked the whole Thames Path unless I walk the whole route.

So, according to the guide, the path starts at the Thames Barrier, so that’s where I shall start my adventure…

The Thames Barrier

Did you know that the River Thames, a tidal river, is considered to be part of the English Coast right up until Teddington Lock ….

All I need now is for everyone to 🤞🤞🤞 that we don’t go into another lockdown before 20th April…thank you 😉

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snippets from my sister 🙂

1. My first job was working in an Orange juice factory, but I got canned. Couldn’t concentrate.

2. Then I worked in the woods as a Lumberjack, but just couldn’t hack it, so they gave me the axe.

3. After that, I tried being a Tailor, but wasn’t suited for it — mainly because it was a sew-sew job.

4. Next, I tried working in a Muffler Factory, but that was too exhausting.

5. Then, tried being a Chef – figured it would add a little spice to my life, but just didn’t have the thyme.

6. Next, I attempted being a Deli Worker, but any way I sliced it… couldn’t cut the mustard.

7. My best job was a Musician, but eventually found I wasn’t noteworthy.

8. I studied a long time to become a Doctor, but didn’t have any patience.

9. Next, was a job in a Shoe Factory. Tried hard but just didn’t fit in.

10. I became a Professional Fisherman, but discovered I couldn’t live on my net income.

11. Managed to get a good job working for a Pool Maintenance Company, but the work was just too draining.

12. So then I got a job in a Workout Centre, but they said I wasn’t fit for the job.

13. After many years of trying to find steady work, I finally got a job as a Historian – until I realized there was no future in it.

14. My last job was working in Starbucks, but had to quit because it was the same old grind.

15. SO, I TRIED RETIREMENT AND I FOUND I’M PERFECT FOR THE JOB!

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Making the most of retirement.

Things have changed dramatically for the current generation of retirees.   These days when we retire, we hopefully have some 25-30 years of active life ahead of us.  It’s a huge opportunity.  However the change from a work situation, to one where there is no structure, is one of the biggest challenges of our lives.

Whatever the length of time we worked and spent travelling to work, and whatever aspirations we have for retirement, filling 40-50 hours each week’s on top of previous leisure times, for the next 25 years, is a major feat!

That’s why going on a pre-retirement course can be one of the best things you can do.   A 2009 study of University of Greenwich found a highly significant increase in life satisfaction among people who had attended such courses, as did a survey by retirement specialists ‘Laterlife Learning’.

What is a pre-retirement course?

There are many such courses, which are purely, or largely, financial.   However we’re concerned here with those that focus mainly on the lifestyle aspects of retirement and also include financial.

The courses help you to think about retirement and the implications, in all it’s aspects and challenge many pre-conceived ideas.

The purpose of such courses is to encourage participants to think seriously about all aspects of their forthcoming retirement in a structured way, so as to increase their chances of enjoying and making the most of this potentially fulfilling phase of their life and avoiding some of the common pitfalls.

A good course will be highly interactive, led by an experienced facilitator and will engage participants in thinking through the changes they are going to undertake and specifically looking at each area of their retirement plans from their own perspective.

As a result of attending the course, participants will often see retirement in a way they won’t have done before and as a result clearly identify issues, opportunities and pitfalls and have lots of ideas and new areas to consider.

For those worried about retirement it will also overcome concerns and fears, making retirement an opportunity to look forward to.

Retirement these days is a time of opportunity and choice.

for more information visit: http://www.retirement-courses.co.uk and http://www.laterlife.com

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Interesting article:

Time was that being ‘old’ in the job market meant 70, maybe 60. Now, when you hit 40, you can be considered ‘over the hill.’

It’s mostly because of stereotypes. Even though people are living longer and healthier lives, employers still worry that an older employee will cost more money for healthcare. They also believe, wrongly, that older employees won’t understand technology. Many organizations think that people who didn’t grow up in the digital world can’t or won’t adapt fast enough. And finally some employers just see the divide between Baby Boomer and Generation X or Y as too great for effective teamwork.

So, say you are 40 or so, or 50. What do you need to remember when applying for a job?

1. Don’t give your age away! Make sure your resume doesn’t date you. Omit your graduation dates. Especially if you graduated before the recruiter was born. Include only ten to fifteen years of experience, any more will show your age.

2. Look good for your age, or younger! Gray hair, a 20 year-old suit and an ‘80s tie was okay at your last job but now it dates you. Get a professional makeover so that you look your best. Impressions matter!

3. It’s illegal under federal law for employers to ask you about your age — but that doesn’t mean they won’t try. Watch out for questions that ask you to detail your career history with dates. You may be giving your age away when you say, “Yes, I was at Microsoft for 20 years.”

Interviewers cannot ask questions about your family, but they still do. “So, what does your family think about you taking this job and moving?” “They’re all grown up. I’ll miss the grandkids.” Dated yourself! These types of questions can be finessed: prepare and rehearse.

4. Overcome the age barriers an employer might have. Show that you are healthy and well. Employers are nervous about older candidates because of the cost of health insurance. Talk about running a marathon, coaching Little League, the yoga classes you take. Give examples of how you work well with younger people — a potential employer concern that you may need to address in your interview.

5. Show why you are the best candidate. Have great but succinct stories that highlight your experience, success and its relevance. Do your research in advance to show your insight into their issues and how you can add value.

6. Hit stereotype-based fears up front with humor. Make a joke of your age if that feels right for you. It could be the elephant in the room that you need to feed a banana! Take out your iPhone and pretend you don’t know how to use it — and then show that you are a whiz with the latest app.

Of course, humor can be tricky, so rehearse your ideas with a trusted colleague. Employers sometimes think that older employees can’t work with technology so prove them wrong, and cite an example of a recent job problem you solved using technology.

Good luck in your job hunting.” end of article.

Wow, some great tips there. Wjat are your thoughts on being over 40 and returning to work, or even just working. Personally I am retiring at 55 🙂

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